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Mets’ Noah Syndergaard rages against MLB blackout rules

Noah Syndergaard continues to make encouraging strides in rehab following Tommy John surgery at the New York Mets’ spring training site, but the flame-throwing pitcher isn’t too happy about how Major League Baseball limits what games fans are allowed to watch.

Syndergaard is currently stationed in Port St. Lucie, Fla., and he turned to MLB TV to watch the Mets’ home opener against the Miami Marlins. Unfortunately, Major League Baseball’s blackout rules prohibited Syndergaard from watching a Marlins game while in Florida, or any of the state’s teams for the matter.

In a video posted to social media by Syndergaard and subsequently shared by numerous outlets, the Mets pitcher raged against MLB’s “Blackout Restriction,” which a significant majority of baseball fans find excessively draconian, needlessly restrictive and excruciatingly annoying.

WARNING: VIDEO FEATURES STRONG LANGUAGE; VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED

“I’m trying to watch the home opener,” Syndergaard says in his Instagram story as he scrolls through MLB TV’s interface and attempts to fire up the Mets-Marlins tilt from Citi Field. “Bulls—. Guess I’ll watch the s—-y Pirates.”

The fact that Syndergaard delivered a brutal salvo at the expense of the Pittsburgh Pirates makes his commentary that much more savage. Then again, the man known as Thor routinely refuses to pull punches when speaking out about other MLB teams.

What’s more, Syndergaard has cultivated a reputation of being one of the snarkier and provocative MLB players on Twitter, so him taking to social media to vent in such a manner is business as usual.

Perhaps further exacerbating Syndergaard’s anger over missing out on the Mets’ home opener is how the game finished with no shortage of controversy due to how Michael Conforto appeared to lean into a pitch to win the game in a walk-off plunking.

While it likely comes as little solace to MLB fans who perpetually bemoan the league’s blackout policies, at least they can take comfort in the knowledge that Syndergaard feels their pain.