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Kyrie Irving blows off Tracy McGrady’s ‘watered-down’ NBA talk

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Kyrie Irving claims to not care too much about the comments made by Tracy McGrady this week about how Stephen Curry unanimously winning the MVP award demonstrates the NBA currently is “watered-down.”

“It doesn’t matter to me,” Irving said, via cleveland.com’s Chris Fedor. “There’s always a different era that comes into the game and guys are going to continue to change the game. We just try to make our imprint as best we can.”

Irving chalked up McGrady’s opinion — which was later echoed by Charles Barkley — simply as members of the old guard looking fondly on the era during which they played.

“The past guys that have been in this league are always going to have an opinion of what they would’ve been like in this era and this new generation,” Irving said. “All you can do is respect what they have given to the game, respect any opinion of the past guys that have given something to this game that I’ve watched for numerous years. It’s all in good respect.”

McGrady provided his unflattering view of the Association during an appearance on ESPN’s “The Jump” earlier this week, saying in part: “Think about when M.J. (Michael Jordan) played and Shaq (Shaquille O’Neal). Those guys really played against top notch-competition and more superstars.”

Given the likes of LeBron James, Kevin Durant, and a handful of other players carrying the mantle of the current generation’s grouping of superstars, it’s not like Curry didn’t have any competition.

Irving specifically pointed out how Curry’s dominance of the league — and how he led the Warriors to an NBA-record 73 regular season wins — provides ample evidence that the point guard position is being “revolutionized.”

But more than anything, Irving’s take on McGrady’s “In My Day” commentary probably is representative of the prevailing opinion of most current NBA players regarding any take from their predecessors concerning the halcyon days of the league’s glorified past … at least as far as the “Old Guard” sees things.