Sportress of Blogitude

Chris Sale using ‘steak, cheeseburgers and taco night’ to gain weight

chris-sale

It practically goes without saying that Chicago White Sox pitcher Chris Sale is about as slight and lanky as they come. Standing at 6-foot-6 and weighing in at 190 pounds, Sale has put on a decent amount of weight coming into spring training after topping out at 180 last year.

In fact, the skinny Sale is making an effort to crack the 200-pound barrier and indicates he’s doing his darnedest to pack on the pounds by overindulging in high-calorie meals at home. His eating regimen of late has been highlighted by the kinds of grub one typically doesn’t associate with top-notch professional athletes in peak physical condition, which he refers to as “junk food.”

“We don’t miss many taco nights,” said Sale, via MLB.com. “My wife makes phenomenal tacos. So I would say steak, cheeseburgers and taco night.”

Despite Sale’s best efforts, White Sox director of conditioning Allen Thomas — who thinks the pitcher could add a whopping 30 pounds to his frame and not miss a beat — cracked a joke about the weight-gain efforts.

“Yeah, every time he comes in, he puts a couple pounds of weight in his back pocket so I can’t see,” he said. “205 some days, 179 some days. It depends on how many Philly cheese steaks.”

Sale’s teammate Adam Eaton doesn’t think the pitcher will ever crack 200 pounds, although he indicated Sale is “blessed” because he can scarf down “whatever he wants to come across his plate.”

Sale, who has been remarkably durable during his major league career, topping 200 innings twice in the past three seasons, credits Thomas for helping him build up his strength despite his slight frame.

“Before I came in, I was just skinny, I’m still skinny, but I have strength in my body and I know how to use it and what to do and how it works,” he said. “Just having a routine, getting in there every day and knowing what I got every day, what’s on my plate. It helps, too.”

Given the prevalence of “steak, cheeseburgers and taco night” in Sale’s daily eating routine, his reference to what’s on his plate clearly has more than oneĀ  meaning.