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Pete Carroll: Seahawks have been in contract negotiations with Marshawn Lynch

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Amid reports over the weekend that the Seattle Seahawks offered Marshawn Lynch a huge contract extension, the team’s head coach took to the airwaves on Tuesday and indicated that the team and the running back have been in negotiations regarding a new deal for some time.

“We’ll see,” Carroll said during an appearance on 710 ESPN Seattle, via Pro Football Talk. “We’ve been in the midst of negotiations for a long time for the future, so we’ll see how that goes.

The purported contract offer the Seahawks made to Lynch was to the tune of $10 million for the 2015 season as well as containing terms that would keep the running back, 29, with the team for the rest of his career.

The reported $10 million offer would be a significant pay raise for Lynch for next season, as he currently is slated to receive $5 million in salary along with a $2 million roster bonus, per spotrac.

As noted in about a million places, the Seahawks stupefyingly chose not to use Lynch in the waning moments of Super Bowl XLIX with the game on the line. The Seahawks, as also argued in about a million places, should have simply called a run for Lynch from just outside the goal line instead of having Russell Wilson make a risky pass, a decision that of course resulted in the soul-crushing, game-deciding interception.

Instead of pointing fingers after the game, the running back played the role of good solider, refusing to criticize anyone for the ill-fated play call.

When asked by NFL Media’s Aditi Kinkhabwala if he was surprised that he didn’t get the ball, Lynch said, “No.” When asked why, the running back stated, “Because football is a team sport.”

There is no doubt that Lynch can bring a team plenty of headaches, primarily due to his stubbornness and steadfast refusal to cooperate with the media. Some say he’s misunderstood, others take a less-complimentary tone when assessing him and his personality.

But for an aging running back who perhaps is on the downside of his career, perhaps it would be wise to pay Lynch the big money, despite the gamble it entails. After all, a team with championship aspirations can never have enough players on the roster who demonstrate profound loyalty and dedication to the team at a moment when it would have been far easier to express utter frustration and disbelief. Especially when said player is the heart and soul of the team’s offense.