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Hanwha Eagles install robot cheering section so fans can virtually attend games (video)

fanbots

The future is now. The Hanwha Eagles, a member club in the Korean Baseball Organziation based in Daejeon, South Korea, have stumbled upon perhaps the way for American sports franchises dealing with dwindling attendance figures to recoup at least a portion of the monies hemorrhaging out of its coffers.

In a scene that is as disconcerting as it is, um, well, disturbing, the Eagles have installed a robot cheering section at its ballpark so fans who are unable to attend the game can virtually root, root, root for the home team. And the team has accomplished that by creating a band of “Fanbots.”

Sounds bizarre, right? Because it is.

Through the uploading of avatars and goodness knows what else, fans can simulate their presence at the ballgame, because why not?

The Eagles explain the space age cheering section in the below video as follows:

Fans of Hanwha Eagles, a Korean Major League Baseball Team, always come to the stadium to cheer for the team. But those who cannot come to the stadium watch the game on the web or on their phones, and cheer through commenting online and via sns. What if there was a robot cheering for those fans?

At important events, the fanbots encourage group cheering…

Most importantly, the fan and the Fanbot made victory together.

And the video.

What. The. Heck.

Seriously, the Fanbots hold up signs and exhibit all other kinds of fan-like behavior … except for overindulging on beer to the stage of utter inebriation and subsequently spewing vulgarities, engaging in fisticuffs and other non-family friendly conduct. Nor will Fanbots idiotically storm the field or try to snare souvenir balls with an infant in one arm or other assorted things that cause us to question the intelligence of the average baseball fan.

Actually, the Eagles might be on to something here. It’s unclear whether the team charges fans to virtually attend the game by controlling a Fanbot, but they should. And we all know major league teams would figure out a way to turn the Fanbots into artificial intelligence-based, money-making machines.

Throw in a quote for an anti-robot attack insurance policy — Old Glory Insurance is the official robot attack-thwarting insurance agency of Major League Baseball, don’t you know (or it would be) — and this has all the makings of a huge financial windfall for MLB teams. All the profits, none of the sweltering masses of savage humanity.

[H/T Big League Stew]

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