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Store pulls Knicks shirt featuring team logo turned into racial slur (pic)

new-york-knicks-racial-slur-shirt

A store located in Manhattan has pulled an offensive shirt featuring the New York Knicks logo that contained a racial slur. The shirt, which featured the traditional Knicks logo but altered so the last few letters of the team’s name read “”g-g-a,” have apparently been selling well but store manager Eddie Nunez reluctantly succumbed to external pressures and ultimately acquiesced, electing to pull the shirts off the shelves on Wednesday amid customer complaints and threats of legal action by the team.

Surprisingly, the shirts retailed for $45, $10 more than a shirt featuring the real Knicks logo and not one transformed into a wholly insensitive article of clothing.

“Everybody’s buying,” said store manager Eddie Nunez.

“Everybody’s different,” he said. “Some people are offended, some people laugh, some people buy it.”

The Madison Square Garden Company, the corporation who owns the Knicks, released the following statement: “We absolutely do not condone this t-shirt, which violates our trademark rights and now that it has been brought to our attention, the Knicks are working with the NBA to have the store cease and desist from selling them.”

Between the threats from the Knicks and complaints in tone to those from Knicks fan Zae Garrett, who said, “That’s not cool. That’s not a way to represent New York City. We’re better than that,” the shirts will not be sold any longer in the store, located on 38th Street and 10th Avenue.

Calls to the manufacturer of the shirt were not returned to NBC 4 New York so it is unknown if the shirts had been shipped to any other retailers.

Even though it would appear to be a no-brainer to pull the shirts in light of the complaints and threats of legal action — let alone making the decision to sell them in the first place — the store did have at least one individual who defended the shirt, even going so far as to say he liked them.

Said customer Jamar Anderson: “It’s a catchy term, it’s used in hip-hop.”

I weep for our future. Catchy. It’s used in hip-hop. Great googly moogly.

[NBC 4 New York]

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