The Term ‘Hooker’ Must Mean Something Entirely Different Across The Pond

Heh. Hooker.

Obviously, hooker is a position played in rugby and since I am a xenophobic American, I have nary an inkling of an idea what in the hell is going on during a game of rugby, let alone any of the terms associated with what by all accounts is a fascinating, fast-pace game.

According to rugbycoach.com, “The main requirement of a hooker now is that he is physically strong enough to take the strain of scrumming,” so when you think about it, at face value, the responsibilities of a hooker in rugby as well as a one working in the sex trade are not that different.

One additional similarity between two – and I cannot speak to this from personal experience, mind you – is that most hookers probably do not enjoy getting tackled and thrown to the ground. Unless you pay them extra up front.

Nevertheless, it certainly is an amusing occurrence when different cultures have wholly different meanings for words, especially when the word has such a visceral connotation in one and a completely innocuous meaning in the other. For instance – and this is a unique coincidence – do you know what they call hookers in the United Kingdom?

Defensive ends, which is one of the best examples of a misnomer as you will ever find.

Six Nations – Ireland hooker Flannery cited [Yahoo! Eurosport]

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1 Comment

  1. Martin

    February 17, 2010 at 3:05 pm

    Across the pond, Flannery would have gotten 2 mins in NFL for triping, albeit without a stick

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